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Stay Healthy During Summer Travel

Flying to Boston with Don (and the kids) for our first summer trip

My 10-year-old was shouting that her red backpack was missing. My husband was carrying luggage out to the driveway, checking his watch every minute and calculating our dwindling time left before departure. My 13-year-old was ready to go but refusing to help anyone else get ready to go. I was trying to decide what to do with the strawberries in our refrigerator that would spoil in our absence. The dog needed to be fed. The thermostat needed to be adjusted.  I had to get my sunglasses out of my car and water the plants on the front porch. Why, oh why, do we take vacations again?

 

A few days ago, we left for our first family vacation this summer. And I was reminded once again why travel – especially family travel with kids – is so stressful.

 

The pre-vacation period for me is especially hard. I have a recurring dream about packing – always at the last minute – and rushing to the airport, knowing I'll miss my plane. I dread packing, and I'm always sure I'm forgetting something crucial. Finishing home and work projects and arranging pet and plant care is also time-intensive and difficult. And just getting to the airport without a meltdown by at least one of us – well, that may be too much to ask.

 

Once we get to our chosen vacation spot, the stress may continue. Navigating new cities and towns, staying in hotels, dealing with different time zones and airports all take a toll on our physical and mental health.  While I won't pretend to have great advice on achieving family harmony during a vacation, I would like to offer tips on staying healthy while traveling, which is a big priority for me.

 

1) Get enough sleep: I aim for at least seven hours. Sleep is critical to allow our minds and bodies to rejuvenate after a stressful day. I use ear plugs to reduce the chance that a noisy neighbor will wake me up. And I try to go to bed and get up at roughly the same time every day (though that's not always possible).

 

2) Exercise every day: Exercising on vacation takes time and discipline, but it helps me sleep better and deal with stress.  I keep a pair of running shoes in my suitcase, and I get up 30-40 minutes early to run, usually every other day.  I might explore the place we are visiting or hop on the hotel treadmill. I try to choose hotels with workout facilities or trails nearby. (After getting lost a few times, I've learned to bring a small carrying case for my phone. With Google Maps, I can find my way back!) If I don't run, I use a workout app on my phone, and I do a short workout in the hotel room, usually a combination of strength training and core body exercises. (My kids love taunting me during the workout, so there is something fun about it for everyone!)

 

3) Stay up-to-date with immunizations:  Tetanus shots every ten years and an annual flu vaccine are recommended for everyone. Flu shots do not cause the flu, and only rarely are they contraindicated. Other adult vaccines that may be indicated, depending on age and other risk factors, include Pneumococcal vaccines (PPSV23 and/or PCV13) and the new shingles vaccine (Shingrix). When traveling to exotic destinations, like many parts of Africa and Asia, additional vaccines and malaria prophylaxis may be needed. The CDC website is a great source of information for foreign travel: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/destinations/list

 

4) Wash hands often: I carry hand sanitizer, and I'm vigilant about using it. Hand-washing may be the single most important way to prevent the spread of infections. Unfortunately, though some people swear by products like echinacea and vitamin C, the evidence that they prevent infection is poor.

 

5) Eat a healthy diet: Traveling often throws off routines, including dietary habits. But I make a point to try to maintain a healthy diet even when I'm away from home. In particular, I try to eat fruits or veggies with every meal, avoid fried foods and saturated fat, avoid drinks with calories (including juice), and don't go crazy with the dessert. I also limit alcohol to one drink, at most.

 

6) When traveling outside of the U.S. and Europe, be mindful of food-borne illness. In many parts of the world, it's a good idea to stick with bottled water, avoid drinks with ice, and avoid uncooked or unpeeled produce.  Pick up a travel book from the library or do a little on-line research ahead of time to identify any recommended food restrictions for your destination.

 

7) See a doctor regularly: Preventive care is important for everyone, and even active people aren't immune to common infections and chronic disease. While I don't believe a yearly head-to-toe physical exam is necessary for everyone, regular visits with a trusted primary care physician (usually every one to two years, depending on age, health status, and risk factors) are recommended and are especially important to ensure good health when traveling.

 

8) Give yourself a day of post-vacation recovery: If possible, I like to return home with at least a day to catch up after being away for vacation. Having a day to do laundry, go grocery shopping, sort through the mail, and prepare for the week ahead, is great for my mental health and make the re-entry process back to reality a lot smoother.

 

Here's to a healthy summer! Please add more tips in the comments below.

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