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The Pandemic: Finding joy during quarantine

Clover and I have enjoyed walking several times a week along Shoal Creek, near our house, since the beginning of our quarantine in mid-March. 

In the first few weeks after the coronavirus quarantine began, I would wake up and think, just for a second, that it had all been a bad dream. At first, the pandemic seemed as far-fetched as an apocalyptic movie: an asteroid hitting the earth, an alien invasion.  I would try to stay in that Land of Denial as long as possible, knowing COVID-19 was real, but clinging to the feeling that maybe it wasn't.

 

I've experienced Denial before – at the time of my MS diagnosis in the fall of 2009. It seemed like a refuge, a welcome escape from reality. But eventually, I worked up the courage to face my vulnerability and new normal. Now, most of the time, MS is an afterthought.

 

Will COVID-19 become that way too? Indeed, we are getting used to new routines, to face masks, to virtual meetings. But I feel nostalgic for carefree grocery shopping and dinner with my extended family, and I'm disheartened by news that we aren't likely to return to our old way of life anytime soon. Odds are good most of us are going to continue spending a lot more time at home than we ever have before.

 

I am heartbroken for our world, the lost lives, the lost jobs, the cancelled events, plans, and dreams. But for those of us who are fortunate to be healthy and stuck at home, how do we make it bearable, even fun? 

 

As I have with MS, I am discovering some surprising silver linings, connecting in new ways with my family, and looking for the lessons that come with any big change. Here are some quarantine-survival strategies that I hope may help you, too, make the best of this strange and challenging time:

 

1) Laugh: Escape from the gloomy news and play a game (we like Scattergories and Ticket to Ride). "Chalk Bomb" a friend or neighbor by drawing pictures and encouraing messages on their driveway.  Or enjoy some of the hilarious Internet videos that creative folks have posted about our current situation. Here are three favorites:

        - Saturday Night Live zoom call

        - Family parody of Les Misérables, "One Day More"

        - Coronavirus Rhapsody 

 

2) Make a difference: Sewing masks has been a great outlet for many and a way to help us all stay safer. But there are many other ways to help from home.  My kids created a virtual fundraiser for the Central Texas Food Bank and posted it on our neighborhood listserv. Austin's Generation Serve has recommended creative ways for kids to contribute.  And Thrive Global shared a great list of other volunteer opportunities you can do from home

 

3) Declutter and organize your space: If you're stuck home for weeks and months on end, make it beautiful and peaceful. Read Marie Kondo's The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up or watch her show on Netflix for inspiration. (Of course, there is nowhere to donate anything, but find a closet or corner to stash discarded items until the beautiful day when you can pass them along to Good Will or a new home).

 

4) Meditate: Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) meditation is life-changing for many people, teaching us to focus on the present moment and greet each moment with acceptance and care. It has proven health benefits and is an important tool to deal with stress and anxiety. It also can help with sleep, pain, and general well-being. Some online MBSR classes are available. I also like the free app, Insight Timer, for an incredible selection of guided meditations.

 

5) Start a journal: I've kept a daily journal since childhood, and it helps me process events, track any health issues that pop up, and feel a sense of closure and completeness at the end of the day. I think journal-writing is a great stress management tactic and an important way to gain personal insights. We are living through a remarkable time in history, so keeping an account of daily life during this pandemic is particularly meaningful. 

 

6) Take care of your mental health: Connect with friends via phone, walks outside (separated by at least six feet), social media, or old-fashioned letter-writing.  Find a good "escape" book to read. And have fun being at home! Here are some favorite homebound activities: design a photo album online (I like www.snapfish.com, but there are many options), make bread from scratch, do a jigsaw puzzle, start a garden (even if it's on a balcony or window sill), make a scrapbook or collage, or draw or paint (use a favorite vacation photo for inspiration). Also, don't drink too much alcohol (limit yourself to no more than one drink a day for women or two for men).

 

I hope my tips are helpful. Please share what are you doing to create joy and meaning in the comments below.

 

 

 
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