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Self Care: Part 2

This Mother's Day, I got back on my bike for the first time since the MS150 for a morning ride my mom and daughter.

A trip with my 10-year-old, Clara, to Laguna Gloria Art Museum to make robots for Family Day; a stop by the community garden to pick carrots; dinner at a favorite neighborhood restaurant; a good movie with Don; and a morning Mother's Day bike right with my 13-year-old, Ella, and my mom have resulted in a pretty ideal weekend. Busy, but not overly so. Productive, but fun. Quality time with many of my favorite people. Now I'm ready for my afternoon Texas Physicians for Social Responsibility board meeting and a low-key family dinner. 

 

This all ties into self-care, and below is Part 2 of my blog about my recommendations and personal self-care strategy. These questions came from a reporter who was writing an article for the New York Times. She did not end up using my answers, but I wanted to share them anyway, in case they are helpful.

 

What dietary behaviors do you believe protect your health – do you practice what you preach to your patients?

I feel strongly that I can't advocate for good health habits effectively if I don't follow them myself. I am a long-time vegetarian except I occasionally eat fish. I also am one of few Americans who actually eat more than five servings a day of fruits and veggies. Having MS has made me even more careful with my diet. I also try to set a good example for my kids, though it's led to few heated discussions about why I won't buy them Doritos.

What do you advise patients to do?

I tell patients that there is no magic to a healthy diet or to weight loss, which is often the goal. To lose weight, cut calories and exercise. For everyone, I suggest avoiding sugar-sweetened beverages, making sure that each meal contains at least one serving of fruits and/or vegetables (aiming for at least five servings a day – and even more is better), and avoiding fried and highly-processed foods. Keeping salt intake to a minimum (less than two teaspoons) is another good rule of thumb. Limiting alcohol, too, is important.

Do you take vitamins or supplements?

I don't take vitamins or supplements, except for calcium (for bone health) and vitamin D (only because I have MS). Evidence supporting most vitamins and supplements is pretty poor for those with a well-balanced diet. 

What about exercise?

I'm obsessed with exercise. I started exercising nearly every day over twenty years ago as a medical student. Exercise in my stress-reliever, my antidepressant, and helps prevent anxiety. I run or do another aerobic activity every morning just after I get up. I think exercise if the most important thing I do for my health – by far.

What are your thoughts about elective medical procedures - eg.back surgery, knee/hip/shoulder replacements?
I really try to practice evidence-based medicine. Some procedures – such as knee surgery for meniscal tears – have not been shown to be better than nonsurgical care. I do not advocate these procedures that only add to soaring health care costs and subject patients to unnecessary risks.


Tell me your thoughts about incidentalomas?

Incidentalomas are extremely common and are one driver behind escalating health care costs. Patients – and even some health care providers – often think that more screening, more testing is better. The problem, of course, is that we find things we aren't expecting, that often will never become a problem, but also can't – with 100% certainty – be safely ignored. I experienced a scare years ago as a patient when my doctor thought she detected an ovarian mass on a bimanual pelvic exam (a type of exam that is no longer recommended by many authorities in those without symptoms). I ended up needing an uncomfortable pelvic ultrasound – to the tune of hundreds of dollars and significant personal anxiety – to prove that it was nothing.


Do you watch your weight?

Yes. I have been fortunate that I've always had a healthy weight, and I've never been on a diet (except for a couple weird ones that I tried to alleviate MS symptoms), but I still work to maintain my weight through healthy nutritional choices and daily exercise. I keep a scale in my closet and check my weight regularly.

What do you do in general to keep healthy?

I strive for a healthy diet, daily exercise, daily (short) meditation, and seven to eight hours of sleep each night – usually I can do this!

What do you think are the most important things people can do?

Exercise and a healthy diet are more important than any pills or tests that a doctor can offer. However, people can still get sick (I got MS!). Having a trusted physician who can help when symptoms develop and getting screening tests and immunizations as recommended are critical as well.  

What are your hopes for medical care in the future?

I hope that as a society we can take steps to better support healthy habits and to offer truly universal, affordable health care.

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